The 14 Fake Olive Oil Companies Are Revealed and How To Find Real Olive Oil

The 14 Fake Olive Oil Companies Are Revealed and How To Find Real Olive Oil
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Allegedly, even 70% of olive oil in the markets in the U.S is fake, cut with economical oils like sunflower and canola. Olive oil is supposed to be healthy, but now it is corrupted. It was established that even 7 of the biggest olive oil producers in the USA, mix their products with cheap oils to gain more profits.

The 14 Fake Olive Oil Companies Are Revealed and How To Find Real Olive Oil

The 14 Fake Olive Oil Companies Are Revealed and How To Find Real Olive Oil

This is similar to the 2008 practice in Italy when 400 police officers were involved in the breakdown known as operation Golden Oil.  This meant closing 85 oil farms that mixed some percentage chlorophyll with sunflower and canola into the olive oil. The oil was mixed, perfumed colored, and flavored too. After that, not one brand named extra virgin olive oil got the 2012 certificate of approval.

This scam made the California University study 124 imported oils and found that over 70% of samples failed the tests.

These failed:

  • Mezzetta
  • Carapelli
  • Pompeian
  • Primadonna
  • Mazola
  • Sasso
  • Colavita
  • Star
  • Antica Badia
  • Whole Foods
  • Safeway
  • Felippo Berio
  • Coricelli
  • Bertolli
The 14 Fake Olive Oil Companies Are Revealed and How To Find Real Olive Oil

The 14 Fake Olive Oil Companies Are Revealed and How To Find Real Olive Oil

These brands passed:

  • Corto olive
  • Lucero
  • McEvoy Ranch Organic
  • Omaggio
  • California Olive Branch
  • Bariani Olive oil
  • Lucini
  • Ottavio
  • Olea Estates
  • Cobram Estate
  • Kirkland Organic

You can as well test the olive oil yourself at home. You just have to put the bottle in a cold place, for example, the fridge. If it gets solid, it is pure and has monounsaturated fats.

The 14 Fake Olive Oil Companies Are Revealed and How To Find Real Olive Oil

The 14 Fake Olive Oil Companies Are Revealed and How To Find Real Olive Oil

  How to find real olive oil

1. Be very skeptical with labels and also stay away from “light” varieties

Usually the labels like “cold pressed” or “first cold pressed” are just lip service. Extra-virgin olive oil is characteristically spun with centrifuges fairly than pressed, so the term is typically pointless nowadays.

Even the extremely popular “extra-virgin” label does not mean much, as some low-grade fake oils even put the “extra-virgin” label on their bottles illegally.

You should definitely stay away from anything labeled with pointless buzzwords like “natural,” “pure,”  “premium,” “made in Italy” and the like.

Also “light” olive oil. Stay as far, far away since it is the worst stuff on the market.

2. Search for respected stamps of approval

Globally, there are a lot of seals to seek out, like the Extra Virgin Alliance (EVA), and UNAPROL, the respected Italian olive growers association, which stamps their recommended bottles with a “100% Qualita Italiana” label.

For Californian olive oils, look for the seal from the California Olive Oil Council—COOC Certified Extra Virgin.

The North American Olive Oil Association (NAOOA) as well tests samples and marks qualify products with a NAOOA Certified Oil stamp, denoted by a red circular logo with a green olive branch. International Olive Council certification is another good one to look for.

3. Go by location

Certain countries are great bets for great olive oil just based on their standards—like Australia, which has the world’s highest olive oil principles. Chile is one more country with a great status as a quality olive oil producer.

Australia and Chile both have the highest marks from the United States International Trade Commissions’ report on the average quality of the extra-virgin olive oil.

Californian olive oils are as well far less contaminated than imported oils, so a lot of people trust oils grown there—particularly if it carries the COOC Certified Extra Virgin stamp of approval as mentioned above.

4. Buy in season and in dark containers

Olive oil corrupts in the light and heat, so you shouldn’t buy clear bottles sitting near windows or in the sun. Select instead for dark bottles or cans, where the oil will be superior protected from degradation by light.

Olive oil can as well start to go bad once you open it, so buy smaller bottles that you can use more rapidly, or store it in the fridge or another cool place between uses to keep it from going bad.

Now tell us in the comments below, have you ever had a bad olive oil experience? What did you do? What about an experience finding an olive oil you love?

source: 1. 2.
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